Gemiyle.

Oh dear readers, I had the perfect metaphor for this post. It was this beautiful metaphor constructed to introduce y’all to my month of travels. It was going to serve as the stage upon which I set my tales of travel, a handy point-of-reference for where I had been.

Central and Eastern Europe. And their rivers.

Central and Eastern Europe. And their rivers.

I was going to tell you that I started my journey in Prague, Czech Republic, where I watched the Vltava River flow beneath the Charles Bridge. Then, I was going to tell you how I followed the Vltava south to Vienna, Austria, where I met up with the Blue Danube. After that, I was going to sail down the Danube to Budapest, Hungary, where I would see the river, swollen after weeks of heavy rain, threaten to spill its banks. From Budapest, I was going to pull a Fatih Sultan Mehmet and drag my boat overland to Zagreb, Croatia, where I was then going to drop it in the Sava River. I was then going to sail my boat downstream to Belgrade, Serbia, where the River Sava flows into the mighty River Danube. After that, I was going to follow the Danube all the way to the Black Sea and then sail along the Turkish coast from Amasra in Trabzon. In Trabzon, I was going to double back through the Black Sea, into the Bosphorus in the heart of Istanbul.

The Charles Bridge across the Vltava River, Prague, Czech Republic.

The Charles Bridge across the Vltava River, Prague, Czech Republic.

Isn’t that the most perfect, beautiful metaphor? Doesn’t it neatly tie together all of my travels? I thought so.

The River Danube, Budapest, Hungary.

The River Danube, Budapest, Hungary.

Alas, then I did some research and learned that the Vltava doesn’t flow south to the Danube as I thought; it flows north to the Elbe. With this one, tiny, little factoid, Wikipedia ruined this whole post. I thought I was being so clever and imaginative. Turns out, I just don’t know my Central European geography so well.

The confluence of the Rivers Sava and Danube, Belgrade, Croatia.

The confluence of the Rivers Sava and Danube, Belgrade, Serbia.

So instead of a carefully crafted metaphor, I leave you with the promise of stories from all of these places are on their way.

The Black Sea, Amasra, Turkey.

The Black Sea, Amasra, Turkey.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s